Packaging design expert Kevin Shaw reveals some sobering facts about the environmental impact of wine bottles.

This year we launched a square wine bottle called California Square. Total Wines was, like Safeway, progressive enough to trial it and its floor staff were briefed to talk about the benefits of greener packaging. Of course, the bottling line bitched and whined about the fact that it would be impossible to use square bottles, and did that right up to the point when we pointed out that three of the biggest liquor brands in the world come in square format. The wine trade has a lot of people for whom the computer always says no.

This vintage ad featuring Orson Welles reminded us of this unfortunate outtakes reel of his ‘well-lubricated’ performance for Paul Masson wines.

Orson Welles Drunk Outtakes

Continuing on from yesterday’s Van Rouge, we have another example of charming French automobiles, this time in the form of John McConnell’s designs for Waitrose Wine Direct (1999–2001) and featuring an illustration of the classic Citroën H van drawn by Benoît Jacques.

According to Eye magazine (Issue 81, Autumn 2011) the magazine’s grid was based on the typical three-by-four subdivisions of a typical box of 12 bottles.

Whilst leafing through the design book ‘Alas! Smith & Milton’ we came across these logos for Van Blanc and Van Rouge. The quirkily Gallic names were created by for the launch in 1985 of the Citroen Visa, a small run-around van available only in red or white. We just don’t think you’d see that kind of charm or humour on a contemporary car brand today.

The book, subtitled ‘How not to run a design company’, is a candid monograph of design agency Smith & Milton who have created brands and packaging throughout the 80s and 90s. It’s a fascinating read and a wonder to see just how many brands they have touched that are familiar from our childhood– Somerfields, Lucozade, Rowntree and (yum) Aero.
Alas! Smith & Milton on Amazon.co.uk Whilst leafing through the design book ‘Alas! Smith & Milton’ we came across these logos for Van Blanc and Van Rouge. The quirkily Gallic names were created by for the launch in 1985 of the Citroen Visa, a small run-around van available only in red or white. We just don’t think you’d see that kind of charm or humour on a contemporary car brand today.

The book, subtitled ‘How not to run a design company’, is a candid monograph of design agency Smith & Milton who have created brands and packaging throughout the 80s and 90s. It’s a fascinating read and a wonder to see just how many brands they have touched that are familiar from our childhood– Somerfields, Lucozade, Rowntree and (yum) Aero.
Alas! Smith & Milton on Amazon.co.uk Whilst leafing through the design book ‘Alas! Smith & Milton’ we came across these logos for Van Blanc and Van Rouge. The quirkily Gallic names were created by for the launch in 1985 of the Citroen Visa, a small run-around van available only in red or white. We just don’t think you’d see that kind of charm or humour on a contemporary car brand today.

The book, subtitled ‘How not to run a design company’, is a candid monograph of design agency Smith & Milton who have created brands and packaging throughout the 80s and 90s. It’s a fascinating read and a wonder to see just how many brands they have touched that are familiar from our childhood– Somerfields, Lucozade, Rowntree and (yum) Aero.
Alas! Smith & Milton on Amazon.co.uk

Whilst leafing through the design book ‘Alas! Smith & Milton’ we came across these logos for Van Blanc and Van Rouge. The quirkily Gallic names were created by for the launch in 1985 of the Citroen Visa, a small run-around van available only in red or white. We just don’t think you’d see that kind of charm or humour on a contemporary car brand today.

The book, subtitled ‘How not to run a design company’, is a candid monograph of design agency Smith & Milton who have created brands and packaging throughout the 80s and 90s. It’s a fascinating read and a wonder to see just how many brands they have touched that are familiar from our childhood– Somerfields, Lucozade, Rowntree and (yum) Aero.

Alas! Smith & Milton on Amazon.co.uk

'The Weight of Hanging Time' by artist Stefano Bombardieri, hung from the ceiling of the Ca' del Bosco winery, near Bergamo, Italy.

Ministry of Clouds is a new Australian wine brand designed by Parallax design Adelaide. The look is very clean and clear, but with premium detailing – that’s some pretty thick paper, right there! Apparently, the logomark is inspired by cloud symbols used on weather maps.  Ministry of Clouds is a new Australian wine brand designed by Parallax design Adelaide. The look is very clean and clear, but with premium detailing – that’s some pretty thick paper, right there! Apparently, the logomark is inspired by cloud symbols used on weather maps. 

Ministry of Clouds is a new Australian wine brand designed by Parallax design Adelaide. The look is very clean and clear, but with premium detailing – that’s some pretty thick paper, right there! Apparently, the logomark is inspired by cloud symbols used on weather maps

Possibly – well, almost certainly – the most beautiful wine visitor centre we’ve ever seen. We’re not sure what’s actually IN the buildings, but when they’re this striking, who cares?

The winners of the 2011 International “Barbara Cappochin” Prize for Architecture are two young emerging talents in the field of contemporary architecture, the Italian architect Fabrizio Barozzi and the Spanish architect Alberto Veiga: it is their project, a Promotional Centre for the D.O.C. wine: “Ribera del Duero” in Roa, Spain.
Possibly – well, almost certainly – the most beautiful wine visitor centre we’ve ever seen. We’re not sure what’s actually IN the buildings, but when they’re this striking, who cares?

The winners of the 2011 International “Barbara Cappochin” Prize for Architecture are two young emerging talents in the field of contemporary architecture, the Italian architect Fabrizio Barozzi and the Spanish architect Alberto Veiga: it is their project, a Promotional Centre for the D.O.C. wine: “Ribera del Duero” in Roa, Spain.
Possibly – well, almost certainly – the most beautiful wine visitor centre we’ve ever seen. We’re not sure what’s actually IN the buildings, but when they’re this striking, who cares?

The winners of the 2011 International “Barbara Cappochin” Prize for Architecture are two young emerging talents in the field of contemporary architecture, the Italian architect Fabrizio Barozzi and the Spanish architect Alberto Veiga: it is their project, a Promotional Centre for the D.O.C. wine: “Ribera del Duero” in Roa, Spain.
Possibly – well, almost certainly – the most beautiful wine visitor centre we’ve ever seen. We’re not sure what’s actually IN the buildings, but when they’re this striking, who cares?

The winners of the 2011 International “Barbara Cappochin” Prize for Architecture are two young emerging talents in the field of contemporary architecture, the Italian architect Fabrizio Barozzi and the Spanish architect Alberto Veiga: it is their project, a Promotional Centre for the D.O.C. wine: “Ribera del Duero” in Roa, Spain.
Possibly – well, almost certainly – the most beautiful wine visitor centre we’ve ever seen. We’re not sure what’s actually IN the buildings, but when they’re this striking, who cares?

The winners of the 2011 International “Barbara Cappochin” Prize for Architecture are two young emerging talents in the field of contemporary architecture, the Italian architect Fabrizio Barozzi and the Spanish architect Alberto Veiga: it is their project, a Promotional Centre for the D.O.C. wine: “Ribera del Duero” in Roa, Spain.

Possibly – well, almost certainly – the most beautiful wine visitor centre we’ve ever seen. We’re not sure what’s actually IN the buildings, but when they’re this striking, who cares?

The winners of the 2011 International “Barbara Cappochin” Prize for Architecture are two young emerging talents in the field of contemporary architecture, the Italian architect Fabrizio Barozzi and the Spanish architect Alberto Veiga: it is their project, a Promotional Centre for the D.O.C. wine: “Ribera del Duero” in Roa, Spain.

Lovely little collection of textured black bottles, put together by ohmywine. Check out their Tumblr – it’s like Grogger, but good. Lovely little collection of textured black bottles, put together by ohmywine. Check out their Tumblr – it’s like Grogger, but good. Lovely little collection of textured black bottles, put together by ohmywine. Check out their Tumblr – it’s like Grogger, but good. Lovely little collection of textured black bottles, put together by ohmywine. Check out their Tumblr – it’s like Grogger, but good. Lovely little collection of textured black bottles, put together by ohmywine. Check out their Tumblr – it’s like Grogger, but good.

Lovely little collection of textured black bottles, put together by ohmywine. Check out their Tumblr – it’s like Grogger, but good.

Taking a cue from the the volcanic landscape of Tenerife, these designs for Ignios Origines combine geological maps (the ‘mineral terrain’) with a rock monoprint (the ‘volcanic nature’) and a hit of bright colour to represent the grape variety. It’s a simple graphic system that to create an almost unlimited range of bottle illustrations.
Over the last few years we’ve noticed the trend towards art-only labels, where the typographic details are placed on the back or side. Sure, it’s a bit arty-farty and a bit pretentious, but the same is true of music album covers. It’s the ‘Dark Side of the Moon' approach to branding, and we love it.
Designed by Dailos Pérez, Valencia, Spain  Taking a cue from the the volcanic landscape of Tenerife, these designs for Ignios Origines combine geological maps (the ‘mineral terrain’) with a rock monoprint (the ‘volcanic nature’) and a hit of bright colour to represent the grape variety. It’s a simple graphic system that to create an almost unlimited range of bottle illustrations.
Over the last few years we’ve noticed the trend towards art-only labels, where the typographic details are placed on the back or side. Sure, it’s a bit arty-farty and a bit pretentious, but the same is true of music album covers. It’s the ‘Dark Side of the Moon' approach to branding, and we love it.
Designed by Dailos Pérez, Valencia, Spain  Taking a cue from the the volcanic landscape of Tenerife, these designs for Ignios Origines combine geological maps (the ‘mineral terrain’) with a rock monoprint (the ‘volcanic nature’) and a hit of bright colour to represent the grape variety. It’s a simple graphic system that to create an almost unlimited range of bottle illustrations.
Over the last few years we’ve noticed the trend towards art-only labels, where the typographic details are placed on the back or side. Sure, it’s a bit arty-farty and a bit pretentious, but the same is true of music album covers. It’s the ‘Dark Side of the Moon' approach to branding, and we love it.
Designed by Dailos Pérez, Valencia, Spain  Taking a cue from the the volcanic landscape of Tenerife, these designs for Ignios Origines combine geological maps (the ‘mineral terrain’) with a rock monoprint (the ‘volcanic nature’) and a hit of bright colour to represent the grape variety. It’s a simple graphic system that to create an almost unlimited range of bottle illustrations.
Over the last few years we’ve noticed the trend towards art-only labels, where the typographic details are placed on the back or side. Sure, it’s a bit arty-farty and a bit pretentious, but the same is true of music album covers. It’s the ‘Dark Side of the Moon' approach to branding, and we love it.
Designed by Dailos Pérez, Valencia, Spain 

Taking a cue from the the volcanic landscape of Tenerife, these designs for Ignios Origines combine geological maps (the ‘mineral terrain’) with a rock monoprint (the ‘volcanic nature’) and a hit of bright colour to represent the grape variety. It’s a simple graphic system that to create an almost unlimited range of bottle illustrations.

Over the last few years we’ve noticed the trend towards art-only labels, where the typographic details are placed on the back or side. Sure, it’s a bit arty-farty and a bit pretentious, but the same is true of music album covers. It’s the ‘Dark Side of the Moon' approach to branding, and we love it.

Designed by Dailos Pérez, Valencia, Spain 

Is it time to come out of hibernation yet? We’ve been a bit quiet so far in 2014 – it’s taking us a while to get going and, frankly, it’s been pretty shitty outside for most of the year.
But! The sun is out, the mornings are light and we are back on the wine wagon. Not that we were ever off it, really.
So here’s some lovely, simple dots’n’Didot design from Spain to get you started, designed by designed by TSMGO. Is it time to come out of hibernation yet? We’ve been a bit quiet so far in 2014 – it’s taking us a while to get going and, frankly, it’s been pretty shitty outside for most of the year.
But! The sun is out, the mornings are light and we are back on the wine wagon. Not that we were ever off it, really.
So here’s some lovely, simple dots’n’Didot design from Spain to get you started, designed by designed by TSMGO. Is it time to come out of hibernation yet? We’ve been a bit quiet so far in 2014 – it’s taking us a while to get going and, frankly, it’s been pretty shitty outside for most of the year.
But! The sun is out, the mornings are light and we are back on the wine wagon. Not that we were ever off it, really.
So here’s some lovely, simple dots’n’Didot design from Spain to get you started, designed by designed by TSMGO. Is it time to come out of hibernation yet? We’ve been a bit quiet so far in 2014 – it’s taking us a while to get going and, frankly, it’s been pretty shitty outside for most of the year.
But! The sun is out, the mornings are light and we are back on the wine wagon. Not that we were ever off it, really.
So here’s some lovely, simple dots’n’Didot design from Spain to get you started, designed by designed by TSMGO.

Is it time to come out of hibernation yet? We’ve been a bit quiet so far in 2014 – it’s taking us a while to get going and, frankly, it’s been pretty shitty outside for most of the year.

But! The sun is out, the mornings are light and we are back on the wine wagon. Not that we were ever off it, really.

So here’s some lovely, simple dots’n’Didot design from Spain to get you started, designed by designed by TSMGO.

All I Want for Christmas

As featured in HoHoHo magazine, December 2013

Christmas is coming and you want to buy a present for your wine-loving designer friend. Somewhere in the back of your mind you remember that they mentioned a love of fine Bordeaux. Or was it Barolo? What’s the difference? Doesn’t matter, they’re both seem to be awfully bloody pricey.

If you find yourself in this situation, do not resort to the designer ‘wine-ephemera’ trap. Your wine-loving friend has a fancy over-engineered corkscrew, or ten, and I guarantee they use their cheap Waiter’s Friend. They already have nice glasses, a handy foil-cutter (‘knife’) and elegant drip-collar (‘kitchen roll’). And if you think that “I love to cook with wine, sometimes I even add it to the food” fridge magnet/coaster/tea towel is hilarity incarnate, well, your friendship is doomed.

Do you know what your wine-loving friend wants? Wine. Just wine. Wine, wine, wine. Red, white, fizzy or flat, they’ll be grateful either way, whether it’s a bottle they can keep for years or one to wash down their Friday fajitas.

We’re not against choosing a bottle based on the label (if people didn’t judge a book by its cover, graphic designers would be out of a job), but we’ve chosen six beautiful AND delicious wines for you to buy your wino/designo friend this Christmas. Just make sure to give it to them with a casual “Great label, huh? I wonder what it tastes like…”

1. Nyetimber Classic Cuvee 2009; Sussex, England – available from Waitrose, £29.99
English sparkling wine keeps on getting better and better, but sadly the same can’t be said for their labels. In 2012, following over 20 years of using the same labelling and branding, Nyetimber worked with design agency Made Thought to modernise and refresh the brand. The end result (and the wine) is refined, elegant and with classic English reserve.

2. Evolution White; Oregon, USA – available from The City Beverage Company, £13.49
There’s a lot going on with the design of this label, but there’s a lot going on inside the bottle too. With nine different grape varieties blended together, this could be a recipe for disaster (as it says on the bottle ‘Luck vs. Intention’) but the resulting wine is fresh, fruity and very moreish.

3. Bergrettung Riesling 2012; Mosel, Germany – available from OddBins, £16.00
OddBins lost its way a few years ago, but there are signs that the old enthusiasm for unusual and creative wines is back. Bergrettung (‘mountain rescue’) comes from a collaboration between ten wineries to save historic vineyards in particularly steep sites in Germany’s beautiful Mosel Valley. Restrained, crisp, clean – and that’s just the typography.

4. Casa Mariol Samsó Criança 2009; Terra Alta, Spain – available from Bottle Apostle, £9.90
If your friends are the kind of hip young things spend weekends chewing their face off in underground Berlin bunkers, they’d probably appreciate the ravey aesthetic of this wine at their next Dalston house party. Produced by Casa Mariol from the naturally tannic Samsó (Carignan) grape and aged in oak for 16 months, this is rich, spicy and ideal for boxing day gammon.

5. Bodegas Carchelo 2011; Jumilla, Spain – available from Bottle Apostle, £10.35
This deep, gutsy, modern blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Monastrell and Syrah from the lesser-known Spanish region of Jumilla has been our favourite wine for the last year. The bold design, from the Beetlejuice-striped foil right down to the quote printed on the side of the cork, is pretty natty.

6. Chateau Mouton Rothschild 2009; Bordeaux, France – available from your fine wine merchant, around £600
Since 1945, Mouton Rothschild have commissioned an artist to adorn their label, from Picasso to Warhol, Dali to, er, Prince Charles. For the more sophisticated (and much, much richer) gift-giver, then the 2009 vintage of this Premier Cru Bordeaux will certainly impress, featuring a rich, brooding canvas by Anish Kapoor.

HoHoHo

We are very pleased to let you know that we have an article published in HoHoHo, a journal of Christmas creativity. We’ve written about what to buy for your wino-designo friend (wine, stupid!) and picked six of the most beautiful and delicious wines for you to enjoy this Christmas. All the wines are available in London from Waitrose, Bottle ApostleOddBins and The City Beverage Company.

image

You can pick up a copy from various hip designy outlets across Clerkenwell and Covent Garden, including Magma, Workshop Coffee, Look Mum No Hands and Sadler’s Wells theatre.

Thanks to Cai and Kyn for asking us to contribute! We’ll post the article here in the new year – you’ll have to get your own copy before then.

Is this just vin-tasy?

We just saw some shots of the new D&AD Annual (check it out here, it’s beautiful) and one of the pages reminded us of an issue we’ve mentioned before, but we’d like to discuss further.

The striped barber’s pole design for 'Rasurado' wine has been circulating across the internet, via Tumblr, Pinterest and The Dieline, and rightly so – it’s beautiful, striking piece of graphic design and branding. But – and we have really tried – we have been unable to find any other photo of the wine bottles other than the images on the Moruba website. No boxes, crates, product shots or consumer-taken photos of Rasurado brand. It’s not to be seen on the producer’s own website, and seemingly there are no reviews or stockists of the wine.

(In addition, if you look closely, you can see that reflections on the necks of the two bottles are identical, and the embossed numbers around the bases appear in the same location, despite viewing the bottle from ‘a different angle’.)

At Grogger, we see a lot of student work or concept visuals on blogs and websites, and a lot of it is creative, exciting and stunning work. But we are always reluctant to post any work that does not exist ‘in the real world’. The reason is partly that we are a wine blog as much as we are a design blog; we want to know about the grapes, the winemaker and what the contents of the bottle tastes like. But the reason is mainly that design projects (packaging, branding, interiors) are hard work, requiring as much creativity as hard work, persuasion, perseverance and compromise. To actually produce a stunning piece of creative design in response to a real brief (we would choose Paul Belford Ltd’s work for Waddeston Manor as a prime example) is a considerable achievement.

We can only assume (and we are happy to be corrected) that the Rasurado work produced by Moruba is a project that was never actually fully realised. Perhaps the images we see are concept visuals for a project that was never finished, or maybe they were a self-initiated project just for fun. Any creative agency will have hundreds of beautiful concepts and stunning visuals for projects that were never completed, or for routes that were developed or discarded. But we strongly believe that unless the work exists in the real world – a real thing that someone has asked for and received – it should not be entered into professional awards.

There have been increased debate about agencies entering mocked-up visuals as part of their awards entry. Is showing how your logo could look on a tote bag really such a crime? What if you comp the logo on billboard in Times Square? Or onto the moon? It’s hard to draw the line between awarding the actual work that was produced and acknowledging the great idea that could’ve been.

To us, entering the Rasurado design into the D&AD awards was a cheeky decision. D&AD make it very clear in their Rules of Entry that entries must be ‘commercially released’, ‘produced in response to a genuine brief from a client’ and ‘made available to the public through legal mediums’. We think that for D&AD to award it an in-book award is a dangerous precedent, and for those people entering real work that they have created and nurtured to fruition, it could leave a bitter taste in their mouth.

Some colour for Friday! Bold and geometric pattern labels for Motif Fine Art Wine, designed by En Garde, Germany.
(You might have noticed that we have updated our Tumblr theme slightly to reflect the rest of the pink/red Grogger Empire. Looks great with these patterns – hope you like it!) Some colour for Friday! Bold and geometric pattern labels for Motif Fine Art Wine, designed by En Garde, Germany.
(You might have noticed that we have updated our Tumblr theme slightly to reflect the rest of the pink/red Grogger Empire. Looks great with these patterns – hope you like it!) Some colour for Friday! Bold and geometric pattern labels for Motif Fine Art Wine, designed by En Garde, Germany.
(You might have noticed that we have updated our Tumblr theme slightly to reflect the rest of the pink/red Grogger Empire. Looks great with these patterns – hope you like it!) Some colour for Friday! Bold and geometric pattern labels for Motif Fine Art Wine, designed by En Garde, Germany.
(You might have noticed that we have updated our Tumblr theme slightly to reflect the rest of the pink/red Grogger Empire. Looks great with these patterns – hope you like it!) Some colour for Friday! Bold and geometric pattern labels for Motif Fine Art Wine, designed by En Garde, Germany.
(You might have noticed that we have updated our Tumblr theme slightly to reflect the rest of the pink/red Grogger Empire. Looks great with these patterns – hope you like it!) Some colour for Friday! Bold and geometric pattern labels for Motif Fine Art Wine, designed by En Garde, Germany.
(You might have noticed that we have updated our Tumblr theme slightly to reflect the rest of the pink/red Grogger Empire. Looks great with these patterns – hope you like it!) Some colour for Friday! Bold and geometric pattern labels for Motif Fine Art Wine, designed by En Garde, Germany.
(You might have noticed that we have updated our Tumblr theme slightly to reflect the rest of the pink/red Grogger Empire. Looks great with these patterns – hope you like it!)

Some colour for Friday! Bold and geometric pattern labels for Motif Fine Art Wine, designed by En Garde, Germany.

(You might have noticed that we have updated our Tumblr theme slightly to reflect the rest of the pink/red Grogger Empire. Looks great with these patterns – hope you like it!)