Lois Roederer limited edition designed by Philippe Starck.

We’re pleased to have hosted a tasting of Autumn-inspired wines last night at The Clearing. Rich, ripe aromas and orchard fruit flavours from France and Australia, and although the £18 Mercurey was perfect in balance and class, the £7 Chinon was our favourite of the night.
We hope to see you again for another tasting soon, especially if there’s more delicious home-baked bread! #teamchinon We’re pleased to have hosted a tasting of Autumn-inspired wines last night at The Clearing. Rich, ripe aromas and orchard fruit flavours from France and Australia, and although the £18 Mercurey was perfect in balance and class, the £7 Chinon was our favourite of the night.
We hope to see you again for another tasting soon, especially if there’s more delicious home-baked bread! #teamchinon We’re pleased to have hosted a tasting of Autumn-inspired wines last night at The Clearing. Rich, ripe aromas and orchard fruit flavours from France and Australia, and although the £18 Mercurey was perfect in balance and class, the £7 Chinon was our favourite of the night.
We hope to see you again for another tasting soon, especially if there’s more delicious home-baked bread! #teamchinon

We’re pleased to have hosted a tasting of Autumn-inspired wines last night at The Clearing. Rich, ripe aromas and orchard fruit flavours from France and Australia, and although the £18 Mercurey was perfect in balance and class, the £7 Chinon was our favourite of the night.

We hope to see you again for another tasting soon, especially if there’s more delicious home-baked bread! #teamchinon

We had quite a debate about beer in cans last week. In the snob corner were the people that only drink imported stuff in bottles; let’s call them the Environment Killers. In the other corner were those that, all things considered, would rather have more beer and less packaging for their Friday drinks; let’s call these the Pragmatic Drunks that, naturally, including us.
An accusation was levelled at us – “Well, you’d never drink wine out of cans, would you?” 
We are pleased to present Exhibit A. Wine. In a can. That we would totally drink. Well done Union Wine Co. We had quite a debate about beer in cans last week. In the snob corner were the people that only drink imported stuff in bottles; let’s call them the Environment Killers. In the other corner were those that, all things considered, would rather have more beer and less packaging for their Friday drinks; let’s call these the Pragmatic Drunks that, naturally, including us.
An accusation was levelled at us – “Well, you’d never drink wine out of cans, would you?” 
We are pleased to present Exhibit A. Wine. In a can. That we would totally drink. Well done Union Wine Co. We had quite a debate about beer in cans last week. In the snob corner were the people that only drink imported stuff in bottles; let’s call them the Environment Killers. In the other corner were those that, all things considered, would rather have more beer and less packaging for their Friday drinks; let’s call these the Pragmatic Drunks that, naturally, including us.
An accusation was levelled at us – “Well, you’d never drink wine out of cans, would you?” 
We are pleased to present Exhibit A. Wine. In a can. That we would totally drink. Well done Union Wine Co. We had quite a debate about beer in cans last week. In the snob corner were the people that only drink imported stuff in bottles; let’s call them the Environment Killers. In the other corner were those that, all things considered, would rather have more beer and less packaging for their Friday drinks; let’s call these the Pragmatic Drunks that, naturally, including us.
An accusation was levelled at us – “Well, you’d never drink wine out of cans, would you?” 
We are pleased to present Exhibit A. Wine. In a can. That we would totally drink. Well done Union Wine Co.

We had quite a debate about beer in cans last week. In the snob corner were the people that only drink imported stuff in bottles; let’s call them the Environment Killers. In the other corner were those that, all things considered, would rather have more beer and less packaging for their Friday drinks; let’s call these the Pragmatic Drunks that, naturally, including us.

An accusation was levelled at us – “Well, you’d never drink wine out of cans, would you?” 

We are pleased to present Exhibit A. Wine. In a can. That we would totally drink. Well done Union Wine Co.

We imagine that retirement is something like this, but also with Radio 4.

(via ohmywine)

It’s summer! Barmy Italian rosato from Podere 414. It’s summer! Barmy Italian rosato from Podere 414.

It’s summer! Barmy Italian rosato from Podere 414.

A beautiful collection on FormFiftyFive of bold, colourful work from Melbourne-based Bardo, including this mixed-up graphic identity for Deer Wineries. A beautiful collection on FormFiftyFive of bold, colourful work from Melbourne-based Bardo, including this mixed-up graphic identity for Deer Wineries. A beautiful collection on FormFiftyFive of bold, colourful work from Melbourne-based Bardo, including this mixed-up graphic identity for Deer Wineries.

A beautiful collection on FormFiftyFive of bold, colourful work from Melbourne-based Bardo, including this mixed-up graphic identity for Deer Wineries.

It’s so goddam hot all we can think about is crisp, lip-curlingly dry, so very very cold rosé. This rather fetching photo will have to do for now.

decidedlymiddlebrow:

(via A CUP OF JO: Yes Way, Rosé)

We’ve been a bit uninspired lately with most of the wine packaging we’ve seen, but this has livened us up. A fantastic geometric ‘F’ mark contrasted with beautiful typography, a simple tissue wrap and a cute-as-a-button sticker. 
dailydesigner:

Carlota & Francesc by Francesc Moret Vayreda
We’ve been a bit uninspired lately with most of the wine packaging we’ve seen, but this has livened us up. A fantastic geometric ‘F’ mark contrasted with beautiful typography, a simple tissue wrap and a cute-as-a-button sticker. 
dailydesigner:

Carlota & Francesc by Francesc Moret Vayreda
We’ve been a bit uninspired lately with most of the wine packaging we’ve seen, but this has livened us up. A fantastic geometric ‘F’ mark contrasted with beautiful typography, a simple tissue wrap and a cute-as-a-button sticker. 
dailydesigner:

Carlota & Francesc by Francesc Moret Vayreda

We’ve been a bit uninspired lately with most of the wine packaging we’ve seen, but this has livened us up. A fantastic geometric ‘F’ mark contrasted with beautiful typography, a simple tissue wrap and a cute-as-a-button sticker. 

dailydesigner:

Carlota & Francesc by Francesc Moret Vayreda

Bubbling Resentment

We really enjoyed London Wine Week earlier this month. Although we weren’t official partners, we took it as an opportunity to explore some new venues (The 10 Cases), drink some better wines (The Chocolate Block) and share them with enthusiastic friends (hello It’s Nice That).

There were many events aimed at the amateur-to-enthusiast level, including the Wine Car Boot and the London Wine Sessions. The wine world is becoming ever more accessible, unpretentious and, above all, fun and this is a Good Thing.

But still, across Twitter we saw many examples of the exclusive, invite-only world of fine wine. Premium producers presenting their wines to a captive audience of well-know wine writers and merchants. “Off to a vertical tasting of Chateau Megabuques!!!”, “The 1945 was not a patch on the 1934”, “So grateful to the Luxembourg High Commission for their champagne and unicorn tears reception”. It’s a different league of people and wine which feels very disconnected from what ‘London’ is probably drinking that week. (That is, whatever is around £8 in Sainsbury’s or not-over-£25 in Byron.) And doesn’t this just look awfully boring.

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A recent post by 12x75.com entitled ‘When ordinary people taste extraordinary wines’ got me thinking about this. I am an ordinary person, but at the same time, no less important than those at the Bruno Paillard tasting. If those ‘premium wines’ are only every shared amongst and tasted by ‘premium people’ then they are as good as dead to the rest of us. How dull, how boring, how depressing to think that those wines are only ever shared and compared by the same small group of people, year-in, year-out.  I’m fairly sure that just one bottle of Bruno Paillard, shared amongst six ‘ordinary people’ would produce more debate, pleasure and magic than however many were drunk in Michelin-starred establishments during London Wine Week.  

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There are great efforts to bridge the divide. Sager+Wilde are more than eager to open up something fine and old, and share it with anyone who wants to try. Similarly The Sampler has its ‘Icons’ tasting selection at both its stores. But on the whole it feels like the good stuff (as with most things, really) is kept for the rich and/or influential. Yes, this post is at least 80% jealousy – where’s our sodding invite – but when Robert Parker tweets a $100 bottle of wine as a ‘palette cleanser’ it certainly leaves a sour taste in our mouths.

A lot going on in this label design for Calibre No. 5 vinho tinto by Portugese studio R2 Design. A lot going on in this label design for Calibre No. 5 vinho tinto by Portugese studio R2 Design.

A lot going on in this label design for Calibre No. 5 vinho tinto by Portugese studio R2 Design.

The rather enchanting logo for Venus Wine and Spirit Merchants, seen on a lorry outside Tesco in Covent Garden.

A Bit of This, A Bit of That

Yesterday was the last day of London Wine Week, and by the looks of it a glorious sun-filled finale at the Wine Car Boot. We, however, made do with some cans of Magners in a car park.

Last Thursday we were very pleased to serve up some vinous delights to the team at It’s Nice That, and what could be a better match to their eclectic mix of art, design, music and publishing than an introduction the the what and why of wine blends.

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First up was a classic Langudoc blend of Grenache, Marsanne, Vermentino and Rousanne. Well-balanced, with no particular grape making itself known, at 13.5% ABV is was a rich boozy mouthful – perfect with ripe soft cheeses – but not especially refined.

In contrast to that was the Evolution White ‘16th Edition’ blend of nine different grapes. Heavenly honeysuckle scents and a sweet but fresh palate, like tropical Chewits, this wine would be a great match for fragrant Asian dishes and fresh sushi.

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So pleased were we with the Schild Estate GMS that we tried last Tuesday, it was no issue to try it again here as an example of a Rhone blend with added Aussie oomph. Rich, bloody and spicy, it divided the group, some saying ti was too bitter, others enjoying its guts.

Lastly, and the most expensive wine of the evening, was the Shiraz-dominated The Chocolate Block 2012 from Boekenhoutskloof, South Africa. Powerful but balanced, with blackcurrant juice and rich, smooth flavours.It was certainly the winner of the evening, and a beautiful example of the power for blends to be greater than the sum of their parts.

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We drank up the remainder and headed to Duke’s Brew & Que for an astounding selection of pulled pork and beef ribs, plus a couple of pints. Many thanks to the It’s Nice That team for their hospitality, questions and enthusiasm – cheers!

Aüssie Aüssie Aüssie

It’s London Wine Week and we’ve been tagging along by drinking as much wine as possible and sharing it with

Earlier this week we had a mini tasting of two of our absolute favourite wine styles, Austrian Grüner Veltliner and an Australian Grenache/Mouvedre/Shiraz.

The Grüner was crisp and fresh, backed up by fizzy citrus fruit — lemon’n’lime Chewits. Clean and tingly, like electrified silver on the tongue.

The Barossa GMS was medium-weight, soft and boozy in the mouth, but with a bloody, farmyardy after taste, much more savoury than we were expecting. Would be perfect with some hay-roasted beef or charred lamb.

Both wines from The 10 Cases on Endell Street, London

One of the many problems with the wine world is the disconnect between sampling and assessing wine (which is interesting and informative) and the end benefit of wine (which is laughter, joy and snogging). These poster do a good job or reminding us of the simple joys of summer, bikes and sticky wine lips.
Do you live in Budapest? If so, and you’re looking for something to do this Saturday, then head down to the Városliget (city park) for the Wine Bike Piqniq gathering. 
alizbuzas:

Wine Bike Piqniq posters
One of the many problems with the wine world is the disconnect between sampling and assessing wine (which is interesting and informative) and the end benefit of wine (which is laughter, joy and snogging). These poster do a good job or reminding us of the simple joys of summer, bikes and sticky wine lips.
Do you live in Budapest? If so, and you’re looking for something to do this Saturday, then head down to the Városliget (city park) for the Wine Bike Piqniq gathering. 
alizbuzas:

Wine Bike Piqniq posters
One of the many problems with the wine world is the disconnect between sampling and assessing wine (which is interesting and informative) and the end benefit of wine (which is laughter, joy and snogging). These poster do a good job or reminding us of the simple joys of summer, bikes and sticky wine lips.
Do you live in Budapest? If so, and you’re looking for something to do this Saturday, then head down to the Városliget (city park) for the Wine Bike Piqniq gathering. 
alizbuzas:

Wine Bike Piqniq posters

One of the many problems with the wine world is the disconnect between sampling and assessing wine (which is interesting and informative) and the end benefit of wine (which is laughter, joy and snogging). These poster do a good job or reminding us of the simple joys of summer, bikes and sticky wine lips.

Do you live in Budapest? If so, and you’re looking for something to do this Saturday, then head down to the Városliget (city park) for the Wine Bike Piqniq gathering. 

alizbuzas:

Wine Bike Piqniq posters

We absolutely love the stippled gradient on this design as well as the simple Omaga/cave motif. (To be honest we would have loved it even more without any type on it, but sometimes needs must!)
Designed by Eszter Misztarka for Kvassay Winery, Hungary We absolutely love the stippled gradient on this design as well as the simple Omaga/cave motif. (To be honest we would have loved it even more without any type on it, but sometimes needs must!)
Designed by Eszter Misztarka for Kvassay Winery, Hungary We absolutely love the stippled gradient on this design as well as the simple Omaga/cave motif. (To be honest we would have loved it even more without any type on it, but sometimes needs must!)
Designed by Eszter Misztarka for Kvassay Winery, Hungary

We absolutely love the stippled gradient on this design as well as the simple Omaga/cave motif. (To be honest we would have loved it even more without any type on it, but sometimes needs must!)

Designed by Eszter Misztarka for Kvassay Winery, Hungary